Creative Kernow, based at Krowji, is the umbrella organisation for the following nine projects. Together we support the production, promotion and distribution of work by creative practitioners in Cornwall because we believe in creativity's transformative power and want more people to benefit from it.

Music information

Music Licences & Copyright

PRS for Music is the home of PRS and MCPS, representing the rights of over 100,000 members in the UK. They license organisations to play, perform or make available copyright music on behalf of their members and those of overseas societies, distributing the royalties to them fairly and efficiently. They promote and protect the value of copyright.

 

PRS for Music

PRS for Music represents composers, songwriters and music publishers.

PRS for Music administers the performing right in musical works such as songs or instrumentals.

Obtaining a licence from PRS for Music ensures that royalties are paid to those that have written, composed and published the music,

www.prsformusic.com

 

Phonographic Performance Ltd (PPL)

PPL represents record companies and performers.

Phonographic Performance Ltd (PPL) licenses similar rights, but in relation to copyright ‘sound recordings’ rather than original musical works.

So, if you play CDs, tapes or records you may also need a PPL licence as well as a licence from PRS for Music.

Obtaining a PPL licence will ensure that royalties are paid to the artists that have recorded the music and the record labels that own the recording.

www.ppluk.com

 

The Mechanical-Copyright Protection Society (MCPS)

MCPS sits under the broader PRS for Music brand, and licenses your mechanical (reproduction) rights and pays your mechanical royalties.

Mechanical rights royalties are different and are paid to the songwriter, composer or publisher when music is reproduced as a physical product or for broadcast or www.prsformusic.com/Pages/Rights.aspx

 

Copyright

Rightful rewards

Performing rights royalties are paid to a songwriter, composer or publisher whenever their music is played or performed in any public space or place.  This includes TV, radio, online, in a shop, an office, pub or restaurant, at a concert, a sporting event and thousands of other places.

Mechanical rights royalties are different and are paid to the songwriter, composer or publisher when music is reproduced as a physical product or for broadcast or online.

Play | Perform | Reproduce

 

Licences for Pubs & Bars

Do I need a licence?

If you play music in your business for your staff or customers, by law you need permission from the relevant copyright owners. But don’t worry, to get permission you simply need a licence from PRS for Music and in most cases, one from PPL too.

Who are PRS for Music and PPL?

PRS for Music collects and distributes licence fees for the use of musical compositions and lyrics on behalf of songwriters, composers and music publishers. PPL collects and distributes licence fees for the use of recorded music on behalf of record companies and performers.

In most instances, a music licence is required from both organisations when you play recorded music in public. More information can be found here.

How much does a licence cost?

A number of factors determine how much businesses pay – these include the size of premises, how you want to play music (for example, background, live or DJ) and whether music is played on hold to callers.

www.prsformusic.com/users/businessesandliveevents/musicforbusinesses/PB/Pages/pubsandbars.aspx

 

Research shows that wet sales increase by an average of £306 per day per venue when live music is used – this rises to £667 on Friday and Saturday nights (CGA Strategy Ltd).

 

What happens to the PRS Licence Fee?

The fees generated by PRS music licences ensure that songwriters, composers and music publishers – many of whom are small businesses themselves – are paid when their music is used.

PRS distribute nearly 90 percent of the licence fees they collect back to their members in the form of royalties and only deduct their administration cost.

Royalties help ensure their members can make a livelihood from their music and keep them making the music we all love.